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Levin College of Law

CSRRR Race, Education, and Pedagogy (REAP)

About

There has been an explosion and hunger for scholarship at the intersections of race, law, and pedagogy. The Race, Education, and Pedagogy (REAP) library guide is a resource designed to meet this need. The REAP guide, which includes over two hundred sources, is primarily composed of scholarship that addresses legal and social science analyses of race and law. Within the broad categories of race, education, and pedagogy, we have identified four sub-topics areas, Positionality, Classroom Dynamics, Critical Race Theory & Legal Theory, and Instructional Materials. These areas of focus allow for an in-depth look at the embeddedness of race and its impact across micro and macrostructures.

Materials within each of the four broader categories located in the tabs on the left (Positionality, Classroom Dynamics, Critical Race Theory and Legal Theory, and Instructional Material) are grouped into subcategories of pedagogy, social/racial justice, law, race, gender, and sexuality, social science, and history. The resource types (articles, essays, studies, books, and websites) are further divided to allow researchers to view certain types of materials depending on their research interests. To the extent possible, materials are hyperlinked to freely available resources, but researchers may need to be logged in to the VPN to access some materials. For information on connecting from off-campus, please visit https://guides.law.ufl.edu/tech/vpn. A search feature at the top of each category allows researchers to search this guide for a specific author, title, or keyword.

This library guide was conceived, compiled, and organized by Dr. Katheryn Russell-Brown (CSRRR), Dr. Diedre Houchen (CSRRR), Associate Dean Jane O’Connell (Legal Information Center), Professor Gail Mathapo (Legal Information Center), Professor Elizabeth Hilkin (Legal Information Center), and Courtney Diaz (JD '21).